Suffolk's beautiful dawn

PUBLISHED: 13:23 30 July 2010 | UPDATED: 17:38 20 February 2013

Photograph by ROGER DEWSBERY

Photograph by ROGER DEWSBERY

Suffolk landscape photographer Roger Dewsbery explains why - for him - sunrise is the best time for capturing the dazzling beauty of the Suffolk Heritage Coast

Suffolk landscape photographer Roger Dewsbery explains why - for him - sunrise is the best time for capturing the dazzling beauty of the Suffolk Heritage Coast




There is no better time on Suffolks coast than at sunrise. Yes, its very difficult to get out of bed in the small hours on a fresh, cold morning but when the conditions are right you are rewarded with a pristine beach, smooth sands washed by the tide, fresh morning air, the chorus of birdsong and, if you are lucky, great light.
From the point of view of a landscape photographer, the coast is the jewel in Suffolks crown, as this county has no dramatic mountains and lakes to boast about, like some others.
Despite this, the coastline of Suffolk has lots to inspire from the beaches of Benacre with its sand cliffs and driftwood, to Southwolds pier and beach huts, to the fishing boats of Dunwich and Aldeburgh. Sometimes I like to keep things simple, just a single subject on the beach, an old fishing buoy in the surf, a single groyne, or piece of driftwood.
Then again, there are the more difficult panoramic shots of piers and beach huts. Whatever the subject, however, many times I shoot the same scene, each image is different because every sunrise is unique and offers up a new challenge.
I brought my first camera in 1990, an Olympus OM101. Photography was just for fun then but its grown into a way of life for me now, being inspired by the work of great landscape photographers like Joe Cornish, Charlie Waite and David Noton. Today I use a host of cameras from Canon EOS 35mm to my Pentax 67, Hasselblad 500cm and my Hasselblad x pan panoramic camera.
There are two other items I couldnt live without my Lee filter system and my Pentax spot meter, both of which greatly assist with that all important exposure.
As a traditional film photographer, I have to get the exposure and composition right at the point of taking the picture, as I mostly still use transparency film. Getting it wrong can mean film in the bin, which can add up to quite an expensive hobby. However, I think the pleasure of using such classic cameras, combined with the quality of the results they produce, are incentive enough to overlook the odd mistake.


To see more of Rogers work plus details on how to purchase limited edition prints, please visit his website at rogerdewsberyphotography.co.uk

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the EADT Suffolk Magazine