You could have these 10 most valuable collectibles in your attic

PUBLISHED: 18:08 04 September 2020 | UPDATED: 12:58 16 September 2020

Vinyl records are hot property now - what's your collection worth? Image: Getty Images

Vinyl records are hot property now - what's your collection worth? Image: Getty Images

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Want to know what your old vinyl and clothing is worth? Got an old painting or a silver spoon you think could be valuable? Here’s how to find out

Antiques and collectibles are enjoying a resurgence. If spending so much time at home over the past few months has prompted you to declutter, why not turn out your cupboards, attic and garage? Maybe you’ll discover some treasures. But how can you find out what they’re worth?

Well you can go to an antiques dealer or an auction house to get a valuation. Currently, most experts are valuing online. At mearto.com you can get a free appraisal and valuation, plus, should your declutter turn up a work of art you can get it authenticated. There are other services such as valuemystuff.com/uk which has over 60 experts, formerly of Sotheby’s and Christie’s, who can appraise your art, antiques, jewellery, memorabilia and anything else you think may be of value.

Here are ten items listed by cashfloat.co.uk that could earn you some cash.

1. Coins

Always a favourite collectors’ item. Even modern coins can be worth a lot of money, such as those rare ones that are a result of mistakes by The Royal Mint. Rare 50p coins have been changing hands for a few hundred pounds, while Kew Gardens, Olympic Games and EC commemorative 50ps, a 20p piece without a date, and a 2p piece printed with ‘New Pence’ from 1983 are all coins to watch out for.

2. Vinyl records

Most of us ditched our vinyl collections and rushed to embrace CD technology in the 1980s. Now vinyl records are making a huge come back and the most valuable are changing hands for huge amounts of money. You can check online lists such as blog.discogs.com to see what people are looking for and what your albums might be worth.

3. Vintage toys

Vintage toys can sell for a lot of money when boxed and in good condition, but even those in less good condition are still sought after. Lego sets are especially popular, as are cars, especially Hot Wheels and Tonka toys. Porcelain collectible dolls, especially early American ones, can command high prices as well as Sindy, Barbie and Star Wars toys, whatever their condition.

Highly collectible vinyl records can be worth hundreds of pounds. Image: Getty ImagesHighly collectible vinyl records can be worth hundreds of pounds. Image: Getty Images

4. Tea and dining sets

Few people get out the best China these days. Family crockery is usually unused and passed down from generation to generation. A set can be worth a surprising amount of money if it’s undamaged and complete.

5. Ceramics and silverware

Silverware is always clearly hallmarked allowing you to see the maker, age and where it was manufactured. Ceramics of any value have a clear stamp on the base that enables you to find out when and where they were made and their value. Royal Dalton, Royal Worcester and Staffordshire potteries are all worth looking out for.

6. Furniture and light fittings

Art Deco is hugely popular – an old table or light fitting from the 1920s or 1930s could be quite valuable. Mid century furniture (1950s) such as Ercol and 1970s Ikea furniture is worth considerably more than when it was originally sold. Many of these items were not popular at the time that they were manufactured which meant fewer were made and lines dropped altogether. This makes them rare and sought after today.

Read: a wonderful barn at Friday Street full of eclectic antiques and collectibles

7. Books and comics

Bought for a few pence they can be worth thousands of pounds now. Some old editions of children’s books that you might have in boxes in the loft, such as The Wind in the Willows, Charlotte’s Web and The Secret Garden, are all highly collectible. Harry Potter books can command large sums of money even if they’re not in pristine condition.

8. Electronics

Some of the first gaming consoles have sold for thousands of pounds while retro Walkmans are changing hands for hundreds. Astonishingly, the first iPods are now collectible, as are early release mobile phones

9. Clothing and accessories

Vintage clothing packed away in attics from the 1960s and 1970s can be worth a fortune. Even more modern designer items can be worth more that what you paid for them. Check online at valuemystuff.com to see what’s currently selling.

10. Paintings and drawings

Remember those iconic kitsch prints of the 1970s that hung on many a living room wall? They can now sell online for up to £100. Paintings and drawings by lesser known artists whose works are becoming popular can fetch good sums or you could be extremely lucky and discover you have a rare, collectible antique masterpiece among your stuff.

There are lots of local antiques dealers and auction houses who will be happy to give you an appraisal, such as Reeman Dansie, Mander, TW Gaze, Lacy Scott and Knight, Diamond Mills and Bishop and Miller.

Head to Woodbridge

Woodbridge Antiques Centre is a great place to start. It has hundreds of pieces of antique jewellery, silverware, glassware and more for sale from a variety of antique and vintage dealers all under one roof in Quay Street, Woodbridge. Owner Natalie Smith opened the business in 2007 and has been visited more than once by TV’s Antiques Road Trip. We asked her to choose her five favourite collectibles of the moment and tell us what they’re worth.

1. A curious coin

This interesting coin is the Queen Victoria double florin. It was one of the shortest-lived coins, minted for only four years from 1887 to 1890. Its value was four shillings. It acquired the name ‘Barmaids Grief’ because it was so like the Crown which was five shillings and lucky people spending it would often receive more change than they were due.

Neither coin has its denomination on it and the Queen’s Jubilee Head was identical to both, so it was easy to mix them up. Strangely, after 1971 decimalisation, this coin was not called in and still remains legal tender. It’s equal to 20p but it would never be spent as it is far more valuable as collector’s piece. This example is in very fine condition, the images to the front and the back are clear and crisp. Value: £85

A Queen Victoria double florin at Woodbridge Antiques Centre. It was nicknamed Barmaid's Grief. Image: Natalie SmithA Queen Victoria double florin at Woodbridge Antiques Centre. It was nicknamed Barmaid's Grief. Image: Natalie Smith

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2. A silver spoon

This is a superb, rare, silver and enamel caddy spoon made in Oslo between 1901 and 1928 by the company David Andersen. The business was founded in 1876 by David Andersen and, following his death in 1901, was taken over by his son, Arthur, who introduced the colourful enamelling for which the name David Andersen has become famous. The design of this caddy spoon is so inspirational that it looks modern, but it was made between 1901 and 1925. To be in such wonderful condition when it is around a 100 years old is rare. Value: £195

At Woodbridge Antiques Centre you can find this  silver caddy spoon made in Oslo between 1901 and 1928. Image: Natalie SmithAt Woodbridge Antiques Centre you can find this silver caddy spoon made in Oslo between 1901 and 1928. Image: Natalie Smith

3. A Scottie

In the 1900s an interest in sleekness and speed led to dogs like Greyhounds being popular in design in many areas of fashion, particularly brooches. By the 1920s the small, cute Scottie dog was the new trend, becoming very popular in the UK and US. A craze began of all things Scottie. They appeared in jewellery made in materials from precious metals to lucite (acrylic), and on a wide variety of items through the Art Deco period from book ends to lamps, door stops and fabric. This beautifully detailed, silver gilt Scottie dog brooch, with textured fur and great definition around the nose and above the eyes, is a great example of the Art Deco style. Value: £65

A highly collectible Art Deco Scottie dog brooch, for sale at Woodbridge Antiques Centre. Image: Natalie SmithA highly collectible Art Deco Scottie dog brooch, for sale at Woodbridge Antiques Centre. Image: Natalie Smith

4. Stamp case

This very fine novelty silver stamp case is made in the form of a satchel with ‘Stamps’ embossed across the front in lettering with a distinctive Art Nouveau style. Stamps are fragile and a stamp case like this could have been attached to a pocket watch chain or kept in a purse, which meant you would always have stamp to hand should you need to send an urgent letter. The hinged lid opens to allow placement of stamps inside. Today these pieces have become popular as lockets worn on a chain. When the hinged lid is opened clear hallmarks are revealed for The Birmingham Assay Office and a date mark for 1906. There are also maker’s marks for the renowned silversmiths Crisford & Norris. Value: £110

A novelty silver stamp case hallmarked for The Birmingham Assay Office with a date mark for 1906. There are also maker’s marks for the renowned silversmiths Crisford & Norris. Among the collectibles at Woodbridge Antiques Centre. Image: Natalie SmithA novelty silver stamp case hallmarked for The Birmingham Assay Office with a date mark for 1906. There are also maker’s marks for the renowned silversmiths Crisford & Norris. Among the collectibles at Woodbridge Antiques Centre. Image: Natalie Smith

5. Lavaliere pendant

Lavaliere are believed to have been named after the Duchess Louise de la Valliere, the Mistress of King Louis XIV in the mid 17th century. In the late Victorian and Edwardian era, Lavaliere pendants with their beautifully detailed Art Nouveau motifs were popular again. The Art Nouveau period ran from approximately 1880 until 1910 and was the first modern style to take inspiration from the natural world.

This pendant has classic Art Nouveau scroll details. Made from 9ct rose gold it is set with three gorgeous lilac amethyst gems of varying sizes and studded with pretty seed pearls. Value: £165

An Art Nouveau Lavaliere pendant at Woodbridge Antiques Centre. Image: Natalie SmithAn Art Nouveau Lavaliere pendant at Woodbridge Antiques Centre. Image: Natalie Smith

www.woodbridgeantiques.co.uk

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